Best houseplants for boosting mood – your home will be ‘tranquil’

Houseplants that are 'impossible to kill'

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Plants are known to improve a home’s atmosphere, so carpet and flooring retailer Tapi has worked with Jo Lambed, founder of Beards & Daisies and Dr Sussanna Lux, from Stars for Europe to find out which plant will help brighten up your interiors. The experts have shared three houseplants which Britons should introduce into their homes this winter.

1. Devil’s ivy

The experts said: “Considering the time of year, it is important to pick plants that will survive the cold winter months. Devil’s Ivy is a fast-growing, low-maintenance plant. 

“It is said to bring good luck and fortune, so perfect to boost your mood. The plant needs indirect sunlight and does not need much watering, only when the soil is dry.”

Also known as golden pothos, this houseplant thrives in high humidity rooms as they love moisture. This means the bathroom or kitchen is best to place this houseplant.

If you decide to place it in other rooms, the plant will need an occasional misting to boost humidity levels. Make sure to mist with tepid water to avoid shocking the plant.

2. Peace lily

Peace lilies are popular UK houseplants, thanks to their air-purifying qualities. They have delicate white blooms and according to the experts, make any home a “tranquil space”.

They added: “Peace lilies are great for inexperienced plant owners, as they do not require much water and are also happy in lower light, so perfect for the winter months. 

“The only thing it won’t be too pleased with is overwatering, as peace lilies go into a dormant stage in winter and won’t need much water.”

3. Poinsettias

Colourful poinsettias, also known as Christmas stars, are plants that come in a variety of colours and sizes, perfect for fitting into any interior style.

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The pros said: “Typically, warm colours, such as red tones are great for energising and setting a happy mood, while green is known to have a more relaxing effect and is great to add a calming feel. 

“Poinsettias prefer direct sunlight, so ideally a spot near a south-facing window. These plants do not like cold draughts, so this needs to be avoided.

“If you’re unsure when to water the plant, simply push a finger into the soil by about 2cm, if you then feel moist soil, you can add a little water. Be sure to allow any access water to drain off.”

It is important to give each houseplant the correct care it needs, and this includes placing them in correct lighting conditions as well as watering them the correct amount.

Hammonds Furniture recently analysed Google search data to find the most popular houseplant, and the peace lily came out on top. The pros shared top tips for looking after this plant which needs a “particular set up” to thrive.

The pros said: “When it comes to humility, the peace lily needs a particular set up. They should be kept away from cold draughts, and will do best in a humid room.

“However, you can place your peace lily on display elsewhere in your home and mist the plant every few days. This will mimic their environment.”

Houseplants are also sensitive to tap water, so it is best to water them with rain water or distilled. If this is not possible, try leaving tap water out overnight or for a few days to dissipate.

When it comes to looking after a poinsettia, Morag Hill, Co-Founder of The Little Botanical, said: “Typically, warm colours, such as red tones are great for energising and setting a happy mood, while green is known to have a more relaxing effect and is great to add a calming feel. 

“Poinsettias prefer direct sunlight, so ideally a spot near a south-facing window. These plants do not like cold draughts, so this needs to be avoided.”

If you’re unsure when to water the plant, simply push a finger into the soil by about 2cm, if you then feel moist soil, you can add a little water. Be sure to allow any excess water to drain off.

Britons with pets should also avoid this plant altogether because it is toxic to cats and dogs. If a leaf or stem on the plant is broken, it will leak a milky sap which can be an irritant to humans and animals.

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