When to plant spring bulbs – the key guide for every garden

Gardening tips: How to layer bulbs in a pot

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Planting bulbs for spring should be top of your list of gardening jobs for September. When the sun comes out in the spring and your flowers come into bloom, you’ll be glad you planted your bulbs! Here’s everything you need to know about planting spring bulbs – for every garden.

Spring gardens are made in the autumn. This month is the perfect time to get your bulbs in so that you can have a bloomin’ lovely garden when spring comes back around.

Bulbs are pretty hardy, but the crucial thing is getting them in the ground before it gets really chilly and the first frosts arrive.

Planting bulbs is a really easy and effective way to create a colourful garden.

They aren’t very fussy plants and can be left alone for much of the year.

When you’re buying bulbs, make sure that they are firm and healthy.

When you bring them home, be sure to plant them as soon as possible.

If you store your bulbs for too long before planting them you risk them not flowering: if your bulbs feel soft or show signs of rot, they probably aren’t fresh enough to flower.

What bulbs can I plant this month?

This month is the perfect time of year to plant your spring-flowering bulbs.

Daffodils, crocus and hyacinths are beautiful spring flowers that you should plant before the end of this month.

You can also plant summer-flowering bulbs this month, as they’re made of strong stuff and won’t succumb to winter frosts.

Lilies, alliums and crocosmia are all perfect to plant this month.

You should wait until November to plant your tulips.

How do you plant bulbs?

You can plant bulbs in the ground or even make a bulb display in pots.

Choose a nice sunny spot in your garden with good drainage.

Bulbs can make lovely borders: the colourful plants brighten up your borders and make a really visually striking display. Plant bulbs in groups of six to get the most impact.

You should plant bulbs at a depth of around two to three times the height of the bulb itself.

Pop them in the ground with their shoot – or ‘nose’ – pointing upwards.

Space bulbs out leaving the width of approximately two bulbs apart.

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Make sure the soil is moist, if you need to top off the moisture levels then just give the bulb a sprinkle of water after you plant them.

Be careful not to tread over your bulbs once you’ve planted them.

If you don’t want to plant your bulbs in the ground, or if you have a concrete garden or balcony you’d like to brighten up with some bulbs, why not try planting them in a pot?

If you’re planting bulbs in a pot, mix compost with grit to make soil with good drainage for your bulbs.

You don’t need to water the pot too often while the bulbs are dormant, but make sure you check on the soil and give your bulbs a drink if the soil is getting dry.

The best bulbs to plant in September

If you’re wondering which bulbs to give a go in your garden this year, why not try these bulbs:

  • Crocus: These plants produce beautiful purple, white and yellow flowers. They’re easy to grow in pots or in gardens.
  • Daffodils: It’s not spring until you see a carpet of glowing yellow and orange daffodils. This sunshine-coloured plant is such a cheerful addition to a garden.
  • Hyacinth: These gorgeous-smelling plants flower early in the spring, so you’ll be glad you planted them now.
  • Bluebells: These stunning flowers bloom in April, and are happy in shady gardens too so are perfect for north-facing gardens.
  • Alliums: These peacock-like flowers are a dramatic and tall flower. They flower in May and June, and come in shades of purple.

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