Martin Lewis explains how to claim up to £500 if you're self-isolating

MARTIN LEWIS has explained how to claim up to £500 if you’re self-isolating as a result of the "pingdemic".

The money saving guru outlined on This Morning how Brits can get cash to help them get by if they’ve been told to stay at home.

It comes as the pingdemic continues to cause havoc across the country with one million people told by the NHS Covid app to self-isolate in just one week.

Supermarkets have reported up to 20% of staff are off work in some cases, and pubs, restaurants and petrol stations have had to close because of a shortage of workers.

If you’ve been “pinged” and cannot go to the workplace, you can claim up to £500 if you’re on a low income, Martin said.

Brits receiving certain benefits such as Universal Credit, working tax credit or income support will be eligible for the £500 pay out.

You will qualify as well if you’re caring for a child who has been told to stay home, and as a result, you are unable to work from home.

To apply for the help, you need to go through your local authority – you can find out which council area you live in online.

Martin said that there should also be a “financial support” button in your NHS Covid app if you’ve been pinged that you can click on which will tell you how to get the help.

You must apply before the cut off date, which is 42 days after you were told to self-isolate.

But he warned viewers that many councils are starting to run out of funds to dish out to hard-up self isolating Brits.

“It’s something to try, but not something to rely on,” he said.

What other help can you get if you’re self-isolating?

The £500 Covid self-isolation payout isn’t the only help you can apply for if your income has taken a hit because you're self-isolating.

Martin added that you can claim the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme (SEISS) grant if you’re self-employed and have been told to stay at home.

The grant allows self-employed workers to get compensated for a loss to income due to the Covid crisis.

He said HMRC has confirmed you can claim for the help if you’ve had to self isolate – but there are other criteria you have to hit too.

You’ll be able to apply for the help when the fifth SEISS grant opens later this month.

Earlier this week, Martin Lewis also explained how workers who’ve been pinged can get £125 for staying at home.

Anyone who has been required to work from home by their employer can claim tax back of up to £125 a year to help cover added expenses, such as higher energy bills.

Financial help you can get self-isolating

COVID infection rates are rising across the UK, forcing more people to self-isolate and putting pressure on their finances.

Here's the financial help you can get if you're self-isolating and not able to work from home.

Sick pay

You might be able to get statutory sick pay (SSP) if you're isolating due to the pandemic, even if you aren't sick yourself.

SSP is £96.35 per week and it is paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks.

There are several other restrictions on who can claim SSP, and you must earn on average at least £120 per week before tax to claim

Coronavirus Self-Isolation Payment

You may be eligible for a one-off payment of £500 if you're self-isolating, or caring for a child who has been told to stay home.

You need to be getting certain benefits or be on a low income and applications should be made through your local authority – you can find out which council area you live in online.

Covid Local Support Grant

The government has also launched a Covid Local Support Grant, which will end in September.

People can apply to get grants directly from their councils for help with food, bills and other essentials, but the help available varies between different councils.

Employment and Support Allowance

Employment Support Allowance (ESA) is usually given to people who have a disability or health condition that affects how much they can work.

But you might also be able to access ESA if you were unable to work while self-isolating or shielding because of Covid.

ESA is a contributory benefit, meaning you must have paid national insurance in the two full tax years before the year you are claiming in.

You can apply for ESA online, as long as you have your national insurance number and your bank details.

You will also need your doctor's contact details and information on your usual income, as well as proof you have been told to self-isolate – this can be a doctors note from NHS 111 or an app notification.

If your claim is successful, you'll receive £73.10 per week.

You qualify for the relief if you have been told to self isolate and cannot go to the workplace.

The Sun has also rounded up other ways which workers can get help if they’ve been told to self-isolate.

You might be able to claim statutory sick pay (SSP) if you're isolating due to the pandemic, even if you aren't sick yourself.

SSP is £96.35 per week and it is paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks.

However, not everyone is eligible – for example, it doesn't apply to self-employed workers, those who don’t earn at least £120 per week, and Brits who have become parents in the last 14 weeks.

You can also apply for a Covid Local Support Grant from your local council to help with food, bills and other essentials.

The help available varies between different councils, so check with your local authority to see what is on offer in your area.

You also might also be able to access Employment Support Allowance if you were unable to work while self-isolating or shielding because of Covid.

ESA is usually given to people who have a disability or health condition that affects how much they can work.

You can apply for ESA online, as long as you have your national insurance number and your bank details – and you’ll get £73.10 if your claim is successful.

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Martin Lewis has explained three ways to get FREE cash and it could be worth up to £1,845.

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