Prince Harry holds environmental workshop

Prince Harry reveals how the Queen has inspired him to help save the environment as he meets conservationist Dame Jane Goodall in Windsor

  • Prince Harry delivered passionate speech to young people at Windsor Castle 
  • The Duke of Sussex, 34, met with conservationist Dame Dr Jane Goodall today 
  • Took part in meeting to raise awareness of ‘Roots & Shoots’ global programme
  • Award-winning ethologist Jane Morris Goodall, 85, works with animals in Tanzania, a country lose to both Harry and Meghan’s hearts
  • Roots & Shoots today involves students in over 50 countries with members ranging from pre-school through university in conservation projects 

The Duke of Sussex put on a smart display as he teamed up with conservationist Dr Jane Goodall to take part in a leadership meeting at Windsor Castle today. 

Prince Harry, 34, looked in good spirits as he delivered a speech to inspire young people to help save the planet and take an active approach in conserving the environment. 

Harry was pictured attending the Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at St. George’s House on Tuesday, along with Dame Jane Morris Goodall, 85, who has close ties with Tanzania – a country lose to both Harry and Meghan’s hearts. 

Citing the Queen as his inspiration, Harry said: ‘As my grandmother The Queen once said – ‘Sometimes the world’s problems are so big we think we can do little to help. On our own we cannot end wars or wipe out injustice, but the cumulative impact of thousands of small acts of goodness can be bigger than we imagine.’ 

Prince Harry, 34, looked in good spirits as he delivered a speech to inspire young people to help save the planet and take an active approach in conserving the environment

The Duke of Sussex put on a smart display as he teamed up with conservationist Dr Jane Goodall left) to take part in a leadership meeting at Windsor Castle today

Roots & Shoots is a global programme offering hands-on projects to young people, chosen by the participants Roots & Shoots works.

They aim to ignite and inspire the belief that every individual can take action to make the world a better place for people, animals and the environment.

Founded by Dr. Goodall in 1991 with just 12 Tanzanian High School Students from nine schools, Roots & Shoots today involves students in over 50 countries with members ranging from pre-school through university.

These individual efforts of the hundreds of thousands of young people around the world are collectively said to be making monumental change. 

Britain’s Prince Harry meets Bella the Cockapoo with Annegret Finlay and Karsten Finlay, as he attends Dr Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at St. George’s House

Harry, 34, was pictured attending the Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at St. George’s House on Tuesday, along with Dame Jane Morris Goodall, 85, who has close ties with Tanzania – a country lose to both Harry and Meghan’s hearts

Dr. Goodall has convened a select group of Roots & Shoots students from around the world, annually over the last six years in Windsor, to share their projects, discuss local and global problems and to collectively encourage one another in their work and activism.

Harry has often expressed his commitment to advancing conservation efforts around the world, and has often said that he believes that working with communities is key to ensuring a sustainable future for the planet. 

Upon arrival at St. George’s House, the Duke was pictured being met by Dr Jane Goodall, before listening to an overview of the Roots& Shoots programme. 

Harry then addressed the programme’s attendees before listening to presentations from representatives from Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. 

Prince Harry meets young people as he attends Dr Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at St. George’s House

Harry then addressed the programme’s attendees before listening to presentations from representatives from Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas

Harry has often expressed his commitment to advancing conservation efforts around the world, and has often said that he believes that working with communities is key to ensuring a sustainable future for the planet

Sharing his passion for the project in his speech, Harry praised Jane, recalling: ‘I met Jane last year, and my affirmation was probably similar to how you all felt this week when you met her for the first time. 

‘That she is a woman of kindness, warmth, immense knowledge and a softness that’s needed by mankind just as much as it is chimpkind. 

‘I’ve been admiring her work since I was a kid and it was so wonderful to find that she was even more amazing in person. She even treated me to a chimp welcome which only Jane can do! Well, and chimps!’.

He continued: ‘We also had the opportunity to discuss our shared belief that conservation and community engagement go hand-in-hand. 

Prince Harry and Dr Jane Goodall hug as he attends Dr Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at St. George’s House

Prince Harry and Dr Jane Goodall pose for a photograph with Bella the Cockapoo and young people, as he attends Dr Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at St. George’s House, Windsor Castle

‘I truly believe that the heart of conservation and sustainability is about people. For any of our efforts to succeed, an inclusive, community-centred approach where they benefit from safeguarding their natural assets, is what works; and we have seen that proven time and time again, but sadly not to scale quite yet.’

Urging attendees to help take responsibility for the environment, Harry said: ‘I agree that young people have the power, the compassion and the tools to save our planet. 

‘I hope you all know what a big job we have to do. I say we – I still include myself in this. Just as Jane has a legacy, and I have a legacy – you have a legacy too. 

‘As leaders in your communities striving to making a positive impact, you have a responsibility to set an example with the choices you make, not only in your work but in your personal life too – others will follow, perhaps they already do.’ 

He continued: ‘As we all now know, in the world we live in today, we’ve polluted the air and oceans, flattened rainforests, and burned through the world’s resources. 96 percent of all mammals on earth are either livestock or humans. That means just 4 percent of the animals on this planet are wild.’

He concluded: ‘I have had the privilege of seeing this happen first-hand through my work as Commonwealth Youth Ambassador, and as President of the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust. 

‘From New Zealand to Zambia, I’ve been lucky enough to meet incredible people all over the world who are leading the way in coming up with sustainable solutions – they have developed ways to turn recycled plastic into bricks, create textiles and clothing from 100% sustainable materials, and found ways to use solar-powered energy to light up huge rural communities.

‘It’s innovations like these, born from the creativity of young people’s minds, which will turn the tide for humanity and preserve our planet for future generations.

‘I also read that one of Jane’s mottos is “think global, act local.” That’s incredibly powerful and it’s what all of you are doing, so well done, keep up the good work and always remember change begins right there…. with you.’

Completing his visit, Harry was then seen meeting with the young people involved in the Roots & Shoots programme about the issues affecting them before joining a group photo.

Citing the Queen as his inspiration, Harry said: ‘As my grandmother The Queen once said – ‘Sometimes the world’s problems are so big we think we can do little to help. On our own we cannot end wars or wipe out injustice, but the cumulative impact of thousands of small acts of goodness can be bigger than we imagine.’

Who is Dr Jane Goodall? 

Dame Jane Morris Goodall, 85, has close ties with Tanzania, a country lose to Harry’s heart. 

Formerly known as Baroness Jane van Lawick-Goodall, Jane is an ethologist and conservationist known for her study of social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees and first arrived at Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania in July 1960. 

Dr Goodall has worked extensively on conservation and animal welfare issues. 

She founded the Jane Goodall Institute in 1977, a global wildlife and environment conservation organisation which works to protect the famous chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania. 

The Institute is widely recognised for community-centred conservation and development programmes in Africa, the ongoing research at Gombe, the Tchimpounga and Chimp Eden sanctuaries for orphan chimpanzees and for her global youth programme Roots & Shoots.

In April 2002 Dr. Goodall was named a UN Messenger of Peace by Kofi Annan and has received many awards and honours. 

 

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