The full list of businesses allowed to reopen on Monday including outdoor swimming pools

A NUMBER of businesses can reopen on Monday (March 29) under Boris Johnson’s roadmap out of lockdown.

The PM unveiled his four-step plan to get Britain up and running again last month – and stage one has already been put into action.

Schools reopened on March 8, the same day that Brits were allowed to meet up with a pal outdoors once again.

Brits will take another step forward on Monday when the Rule of Six returns.

This means six people – or alternatively, two households – can meet up outdoors.

Also, a number of businesses can reopen again – we explain which ones can welcome customers back again, and which ones can't: 

What can reopen from March 29?

On Monday, businesses which run outdoor sports facilities will be allowed to reopen.

This means you can go and play a game of tennis, basketball or take a dip in your local pool – as long as it’s outside.

The list of businesses that can reopen – as long as they are outdoors – from March 29 are:

  • Tennis courts
  • Basketball courts
  • Water sports venues
  • Swimming pools
  • Archery venues
  • Riding centres
  • Climbing walls
  • Driving and shooting ranges

However, businesses which run indoor sports facilities will have to wait a little while longer to reopen.

They’ll be able to open five weeks later on April 12, along with gyms.

But if you want to take part in an exercise class indoors, you’ll have to wait until mid-May.

What businesses are already open?

Essential retailers – for instance those that sell food, medicine or building supplies – have been allowed to stay open throughout the third lockdown.

This means you don't have to wait to take a trip to these stores – you can go now, but make sure you're looping your visit in with an essential journey.

Here's the full list of essential businesses which the government has ruled can stay open:

  • Supermarkets
  • Pharmacies
  • Garden centres
  • Building merchants and suppliers of building products and off-licences
  • Market stalls selling essential retail
  • Businesses providing repair services but only if they primarily offer repair services
  • Petrol stations
  • Automatic (but not manual) car washes
  • Vehicle repair and MOT services
  • Bicycle shops
  • Taxi and vehicle hire businesses
  • Banks and building societies
  • Post offices
  • Short-term loan providers and money transfer businesses
  • Funeral directors
  • Laundrettes and dry cleaners
  • Medical and dental services
  • Vets and pet shops
  • Animal rescue centres, boarding facilities, and animal groomers
  • Agricultural supplies shops
  • Mobility and disability support shops
  • Storage and distribution facilities
  • Car parks
  • Public toilets
  • Motorway service areas
  • Outdoor playgrounds
  • Outdoor parts of botanical gardens and heritage sites for exercise
  • Places of worship
  • Crematoriums and burial grounds

What businesses must remain closed on March 29?

Non-essential shops and businesses must remain close on March 29 – but they are still allowed to operate click and collect and home delivery services.

This includes shops that only sell clothing, toys or homeware.

If you shop online, keep in mind there may be delays to deliveries as many firms struggle to fulfil a rise in online orders.

The following types of retailers and businesses have been classed as "non-essential" and are therefore shut during lockdown:

  • Non-essential retailers, such as clothing and homeware stores
  • Vehicle showrooms, other than for rental
  • Betting shops
  • Tailors
  • Tobacco and vape shops
  • Electronic goods and mobile phone shops
  • Auction houses, except for auctions of livestock and agricultural equipment
  • Market stalls selling non-essential goods
  • Bars, pubs, cafes and restaurants except for takeaway and delivery
  • Hotels, hostels, guest houses and campsites, except for specific circumstances
  • Leisure centres and gyms
  • Swimming pools, sports courts, fitness and dance studios, riding arenas at riding centres, climbing walls, and golf courses
  • Theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums and galleries
  • Casinos, amusement arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys
  • Skating rinks, go-karting venues, indoor play and soft play centres and areas
  • Circuses, fairgrounds, funfairs, water parks and theme parks
  • Zoos, safari parks, and aquariums
  • Indoor attractions at venues such as botanical or other gardens, biomes or greenhouses
  • Hairdressers, barbers and nail salons
  • Tattoo and piercing shops
  • Beauty and tanning salons
  • Nightclubs and adult entertainment venues
  • Community centres and halls apart from a few exceptions

However, some of these businesses will be able to open as early as April 12.

Non-essential retail is expected to open at this point, as well as hairdressers and barbers.

Pubs and bars can also open – although they can only serve punters outdoors, so you'll have to sit outside to have a pint.

By June 21 at the earliest, everything will reopen, as this is when the last of the Covid restrictions are expected to be lifted.

At this point, nightclubs can finally host party go-ers, after staying shut since the first lockdown.

But Mr Johnson's plan to get Britain moving again is dependent on coronavirus cases remaining under control and the vaccine rollout staying on target.

If this is setback, then the timetable could slide.

You can still get a Maccies for dinner during lockdown – but there are some major changes to how you can get your food this time.

If you’re not sure what the third lockdown means, or what the rules are, check out our guide.

And if you’re desperate to know when you can get your Covid jab, here’s the online calculator you can use which will give you a clue.

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