Aerial images of Iceland and Greenland’s stunning landscapes

Glacial rivers, rugged mountains and volcanoes: Spectacular images show the stunningly beautiful landscapes of Iceland and Greenland from a bird’s-eye perspective

  • Photographer Ben Simon Rehn soared above the landscape in a plane to capture his stunning images 
  • His fascinating photos show the spectacular patterns made by melting ice and winding glacial rivers
  • Ben said: ‘Iceland and Greenland from the ground are pretty cool but from the sky they’re different worlds’  

These spectacular images show the stunningly beautiful landscapes of Iceland and Greenland from a bird’s-eye perspective.

The breathtaking snaps were captured by photographer Ben Simon Rehn, who soared above the two countries inside a small plane.

Some images show the spectacular patterns made by melting ice and winding glacial rivers. Others depict lush green hills, rugged mountains and volcanoes.

A spectacular aerial image of Iceland taken by German photographer Ben Simon Rehn. It forms part of his series of images of glaciers, glacial streams and nature

To capture his aerial shots, Simon soared above the landscape in Iceland (pictured) and Greenland in a small aircraft 

A single building sits on the snow in a shot German photographer Simon managed to capture while flying over Greenland 

Ben explained: ‘Iceland and Greenland from the ground are pretty cool but from the sky, they’re different worlds.’ Pictured is Greenland 


Ben’s images depict both rugged mountains and volcanoes. Pictured both left and right is the mountainous landscape in Iceland 

Ben said he finds places to shoot by flying overhead and then letting the pilot know, so they can loop back around. Pictured is Greenland 

Ben is a German freelance photographer from Bremen who currently lives and works in Iceland. Pictured is a shot of Greenland

Many locations are so little-known and unfamiliar that most viewers will take a few seconds to work out what they’re looking at.

Ben, 32, said: ‘I began taking pictures like this by coincidence.

‘I was flying with a friend and saw a glacier and just thought it was absolutely beautiful.

‘The conditions that day were brilliant and I could see things so clearly, the colours were amazing.’ 

As well as snowy scenes, Ben also captured images showing lush green hills in Iceland, pictured 

Ben started taking pictures such as this one of Iceland by coincidence. He said: ‘I was flying with a friend and saw a glacier and just thought it was absolutely beautiful’ 


Ben says that over the course of a four-hour flight across Iceland and Greenland he’ll take up to 5,000 images 

Ben said: ‘What I like most are the patterns the glaciers make when they flow into the ocean’

Many locations in Ben’s pictures are so little-known and unfamiliar that most viewers will take a few seconds to work out what they’re looking at

Many of Ben’s images show the spectacular patterns made by melting ice and winding glacial rivers


Mother Nature in all her glory: More shots of the stunning Icelandic landscape taken by Ben

Ben said he finds places to shoot by flying overhead and then letting the pilot know, so they can loop back around.

He revealed that over the course of a four-hour flight he’ll take up to 5,000 images.

Ben explained: ‘Iceland and Greenland from the ground are pretty cool but from the sky, they’re different worlds.

‘What I like most are the patterns the glaciers make when they flow into the ocean.’

Ben is a German freelance photographer from Bremen who currently lives and works in Iceland.

Ben captured this incredible image while soaring over the coast of Greenland 

Ben has been putting together an artistic photo series showing glaciers, mountains and volcanoes in Greenland and Iceland

According to his website, Ben specialises in photography of Arctic landscapes and other hostile regions of the planet


Ben said: ‘The conditions that day were brilliant and I could see things so clearly, the colours were amazing’ 

Eye-opening: This spectacular image captured by Ben was taken in Iceland 

 

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